Powerbait And Trout – Quite A Combination

Powerbait And Trout – Quite A Combination

Powerbait and trout seem to fit together likes peas in a pod, like peanut butter and jelly, or like water and hydration. They just seem to fit together so well. Actually I should qualify this by changing the word ‘trout’ to ‘stocked trout’. It’s always seemed to me that stocked trout are semi-addicted to Powerbait, whereas native trout seem to see through the bright colored stinky veil that is Powerbait and not be as interested in it. There’s a part of me, deep down in my soul, that dislikes the fact that any manifestation of trout can be caught from something that comes in 1000 colors and is packaged in a little jar, but what are you going to do? Sometimes I just want to catch a trout, whether that trout be stocked or native, and Powerbait can help an angler do just that. This brings to mind a quote from the movie A River Runs Through It. Although I have nothing to do with flea flicking, it’s still a great movie, and in it the reverend McLain says, “Anyone who does not know how to catch a fish should not be able to disgrace that fish by catching it.” I couldn’t agree more with this statement, and this goes for fishing with Powerbait as much as any other type of fishing. I suppose, at the end of the day, the fact that a fish is ‘stocked’ isn’t the fishes fault.
When fishing with Powerbait there are a few things that can be done to increase your success rate. Most Powerbait fishing for trout is done with the putty type that comes in jars. The biggest thing to remember about Powerbait is that it floats. This means that if you’re rigged up properly, your bait should be floating above any underwater debris. So, what’/s the proper rig? I’ll explain what’s always been effective for me. Another thing to keep in mind is that your line should be no heavier than six-pound test. I personally use four-pound test for all of my trout fishing, but six pound is tolerable.
For the proper Powerbait rig, you’re going to need 4 things: A Jar Or Two Of Powerbait, Small Barrel Swivels, Egg Sinkers, and Pre Tied Gang Hooks or single hooks tied with a leader. Begin by slipping an egg sinker (1/4 to 3/8 oz) onto your line. Now tie on a small barrel swivel as a ‘stopper’ (it will also prevent line twist). On the opposite end of the barrel swivel, tie on a pre tied set of gang hooks (size 8 or 10) or a pre tied single hook with a leader. At this point you want to add enough Powerbait to each hook to completely cover the hooks themselves. You should have 2 balls of Powerbait on your rig. Now it’s time to cast the baited rig out.
Cast your rig out and allow it to sink to the bottom. Slowly reel in any slack line and set your rod against something stable (many anglers prefer a forked stick stuck into the ground). Your line should be completely taught. Now it’s time to wait. My general rule of thumb is to wait for 30-45 minutes and if you don’t receive any bites, reel in and check your bait. If, after another 30-45 minutes nothing happens, it’s probably time to change spots. It usually doesn’t take stocked trout long to find Powerbait. You can tell if you’re getting a bite because your rod tip will start bouncing.
The bottom line is that this rig works. I’ve been catching trout with this exact rig for years. You see the gang hooks enable the angler to present twice as much bait. It seems to me that two balls of Powerbait are better than one. Two different colors can even be used on the same rig if you so choose. The rig works, give it a try and find out for yourself.

Trevor Kugler is co-founder of JRWfishing.com and an avid angler. He has more than 20 years experience fishing for all types of fish, and 15 years of business and internet experience. He currently raises his three year old daughter in the heart of trout fishing countryÂ…..Montana!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *